A.I.: Artifical Intelligence

The Baker St. Irregular 08-17-2004 11:49 PM
WARNING! Major spoilers ahead without the use of spoiler boxes! Don't read if you don't want it all ruined for you!



I just thought that one huge spoiler box would be a major eye-sore. Besides, you couldn't really participate in this conversation unless you saw the movie, anyway. It all makes sense, if you ask me.

---

Anywho! I thought that A.I. was a very good movie, and I still don't understand why it didn't do so well in America. Maybe it's because we're all idiots or something. I can understand why the Japanese were obsessed with it, though. It is kinda like a live-action anime, in both visual style and content, if you think about it.

But I would really like to talk about the messages and meanings of this movie more than anything else, so let's get started!

I was discussing with my mom how the matter of David being abandoned was no different than a real child being abandoned by their parents. A child, just like a robot, is a human creation, and its creator assumes the responisibility of taking care of his or her creations. This is not the same as taking responsibility for another person's (or a robot's) actions.

That takes me to the matter of free will, that being the ability to think for one's self and know that one's self exisits. Sentience. I caught myself in a paradox when I debated whether robots can truly be sentient. But sentience is a thing of you knowing that you can think and knowing that you exisit. To truly know if a robot can be sentient, you would have to be that robot. Could you prove that it does? Could you prove that it doesn't?

It's like trying to prove that there's alien life in the universe. I think there is, but I have no proof to back up my claim. But no one has any proof to prove my point wrong.

I've often pondered whether robots have souls. Right off the bat, they prolly couldn't have one when they're first made, so they would have to earn one instead. If that could happen, I think that David earned his soul at the end of the movie when he decided to be with his mom for the one day, even though he knew she would die. He loved her enough to be grateful for the one day he had. That's the kind of selfless love that would do it.

Anyways... If I can think of anything else, I'll be sure to share it. But my brain blew out. I'm looking forward to see what you guys will talk about! Big Grin Yay!
Seraphim 08-18-2004 12:00 AM
Oooh, I hated this movie.

1) I hate Haley Joel Osment.
2) The ending was just sort of like "Oh, look, everyone is dead. Robots are alive now, though. How about that."
3) The plot was fantastically predictable.
4) The beginning was just like "Alright, voiceover, let's get right into the boring and predictable plot without building anything up."
5) The ending was an obvious attempt to jerk some tears. It wasn't well done in any particular way. It seemed so... stock. "Alright, take the little kid, throw in the dead mother for ONLY ONE DAY (for some reason) and let's see some tears."
6) And what was that thing with the snow queen or whatever? I mean, really... and then he gets frozen. But wow, none of his internal systems are damaged.
7) The shallow and empty dialogue on ethics - Yeah, it raises some questions, but it felt absolutely dry to me.

As for sentience, I think you can create an AI that will produce the response "I exist." but not actually THINK. Just the way computers work. There's a different depth to human brains that makes it fairly unreplicable in the computer.

About the aliens... you can never prove anything wrong, just prove things right... Tongue

Anyway, I really didn't like this film.... Frown

However, there were certain things I DID like.

1) The Robot Circus - I'm sorry, I just love seeing robots explode. Whether it's in Star Wars, I,Robot or AI, Robots exploding is just plain entertaining.
2) The scene where Osment's face melts off - I had a mental picture of this all throughout the Sixth Sense and FINALLY they gave it to me as part of AI! I've been waiting for this one.
3) The Robot Teddy Bear - That thing was so cute.
4) Blinking Lights - I'm a sucker for the blinking lights.

Smile
JAYCZero 08-18-2004 12:06 AM
Well Mistress Samwise I have to say that AI was one of the Best
Sci Fi Robot Films I have ever scene , I mean I was watching
over and over again . That movie almost made me cry at the ending
part when his Mom Died again and what really got to me was
when he waited 2 thousand years praying to the Fairy to turn
him into a real boy again so that he can go back to his mother.
And it was a Sad Movie , I mean very touching , it also looked so
Real and Astonishing Cinamatography and that part that looked
Eyepoppingly Amazing when this Professor touched the back of
this Ladies teeth and then all of a sudden you could see her
Exoskeleton face . The Movie is The Best and Jude Law played
an Excellent Role on that Movie , I mean everything about that
movie was Flawless , and I mean very Flawless everything looked
real , not even a slight of CGI or Computer Generated Graphics
I Highly recommend anybody to watch this movie .
Travis Bickle 08-18-2004 01:07 PM
AI was a wonderful movie, but lots of people hated it because it was too odd and the ending did kind of suck. If it were fully made by Kubrick, then it would probobly be one of the best Sci Fi movies of all time. However, Spielberg added his touches to it, and he kind of f***ed it up from what it could have been.

Yes, the flesh fair scene was f***ing awesome. "He who casts the first stone is without sin."

By the way, if I remember correctly, in the credits, the aliens at the end are reffered to as machines, and are voiced by Ben Kingsly. Is that just me? I mean, I own the DVD, but don't feel like going back and looking.
Buck Buck #1 08-19-2004 04:30 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Ignignokt
AI was a wonderful movie, but lots of people hated it because it was too odd and the ending did kind of suck. If it were fully made by Kubrick, then it would probobly be one of the best Sci Fi movies of all time. However, Spielberg added his touches to it, and he kind of f***ed it up from what it could have been.

Yes, the flesh fair scene was f***ing awesome. "He who casts the first stone is without sin."


That pretty much sums up how I feel.
Avenir 02-20-2005 01:15 AM
Despite it's many flaws (most notably it's mediocre ending) and poor reviews, I absolutely adore A.I. The scientific philosophy within the film is quite intriguing. Though Stanley Kubrick's ideals are unfortunately slashed with Steven Speilberg's somehwhat horrendous alternatives.
Travis Bickle 02-20-2005 01:27 AM
I'm one of the few individuals in this world that actually truly enjoyed this movie (except for the ending). Sure, kubrick would probobly have done a much better job, but Spielburg did the best that he could. Jigalo Joe was one of my favorite charachters in the movie ("Hey, Joe, waddaya know?") and I liked the nice little "surprise" near the end. Highly reccomended (but be prepared to dislike if necessary).
Avenir 02-20-2005 01:38 AM
Joe was a very interesting character, and Jude Law's performance as him was excellent. A very likable character that, in addition to Teddy, really put a touch of groove into the darkening tone of the story. I was very disappointed to see him be apprehended so easily towards the end, and he was quite under-developed.

My personal favorite of the technological advancments in the entire film, however, in addition to the androids, was the amphibicopter. Something about this hovering, submergable, and holographically navigated aircraft really caught my interest.
Generalissimo D 02-20-2005 10:44 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Cerpin Taxt

Yes, the flesh fair scene was f***ing awesome. "He who casts the first stone is without sin."


Its "He who casts the first stone is without sim" the whole anti-articficial thing. Tongue
Lyinginbedmon 02-20-2005 10:56 AM
I hated the Circus scene, I think anyone who can get pleasure from beating up and abusing machines is just plain sadistic.

On whether or not machines can have sentience, there are two options:
  • 1. We can create a machine for one purpose and then have it perform the definition of 'life' when this was not the purpose it was created for. This was the method used to prove that Lt. Cdr. Data was a sentient, living, being and was successful in its use.
  • 2. We can try and do the impossible and attempt to look beyond the 1s and 0s, and really get into the head of the machines. To quote I, Robot
    quote:
    "Why is it that robots left in the dark will seek out the light? Why is it that when robots are stored in empty containers they will group together rather than stand alone? Random segments of code, or is it something more?"



Personally, I think that machines should have all the rights of humans and that they are thusly just as sentient as humans.

"It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt"
Zopwx2 02-20-2005 11:30 AM
I saw it only once, but I remember it starting out pretty well and being pretty good, but right when I thought it was over....... it started up again and went on for another hour about aliens. I began to tune it out.

He should have died underwater looking for the blue fairy, pessimistic sure, but whatever.
Diverse Considerations 02-22-2005 01:25 PM
Disliked it immensely. I'd say it was fortunate that I went with a friend who worked at the movie theatre so we didn't have to pay, but that means that we missed out on watching something enjoyable because we saw that crap.

Not half an hour into it we were MST3K-ing it like mad. It was the only way we could stay alive. And don't get me started on the ending...

But if you could get something out of it, I'm glad. ^_^
Sharpshooter005 02-22-2005 04:05 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Seebach: [Zopwx2]
I saw it only once, but I remember it starting out pretty well and being pretty good, but right when I thought it was over....... it started up again and went on for another hour about aliens. I began to tune it out.

He should have died underwater looking for the blue fairy, pessimistic sure, but whatever.


Having only seen it once, and forgetting large parts of it (except the end), I've always kind of assumed Kubrick's influence ended with the blue fairy, and Spielberg took over with the future robots/aliens.

That may be an oversimplification, and I'm probably wrong, but it just kind of seemed that way.
Ano Hito 03-12-2005 03:04 PM
I didn't care much for it since I thought it was too cutesy and the philosiphising struck me as a bit shallow.
dancinggummi88 06-15-2005 09:26 AM
i thought this movie was okay to see it once....
it was kind of slow paced so i wouldnt want to sit through it agian...
but i thought that the ending was good even though it was kinda sad
088nd 06-15-2005 10:00 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Ano Hito
I didn't care much for it since I thought it was too cutesy and the philosiphising struck me as a bit shallow.


That's what I thought.
Travis Bickle 10-20-2006 12:37 AM
After watching pretty much every Spielberg made in the past 10 years this past couple of weeks, I have come to terms with the fact that this movie (along with the majority of all movies he made within the past 10 years) completly sucks.
Nine Kuze 10-20-2006 12:53 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Travis Bickle
After watching pretty much every Spielberg made in the past 10 years this past couple of weeks

That was your first mistake.

quote:
I have come to terms with the fact that this movie (along with the majority of all movies he made within the past 10 years) completly sucks.

Also, I guess since this is a thread about A.I., and to be fair I haven't seen it, but I bit it would have been a much better film if Stanley Kubrick finished it instead of ol' boy Spielberg. Also regarding that interval of time, I'm glad that doesn't include Schindler's List and I just saw it recently but Saving Private Ryan was alright.

What other films does that fall under? Minority Report, Munich, Catch Me If You Can, War of the Worlds... I think you may in fact be on to something here.
Peace.