Satoshi Kon

dawnstrider 12-02-2003 11:16 AM
Heh, sorry - another non-instrumental thread, but I've browsed a recent edition of Newtype, and finally came accross the name behind a personal favorite Smile .

I'm sure most of you know, he's the mind behind Prefect Blue, Millenium Actress, and, most recently, Tokyo Godfathers. He was also the one who directed the movie adaptation of Roujin Z.

I had seen Perfect Blue, and was taken by it. I love his ability to mesh social comentary with the ability to bend how his characters and viewers see reality. That was prevalent in Perfect Blue and, from what I hear, his other works. He's also made manga and a few live-action movies, though I'm afraid I can't name them off the top of my head. If anyone else has seen or is more familiar with his other works, by all means please share Smile .
Bllue 12-02-2003 07:22 PM
Ummmmmmmmmmmmmmm. Cool. i think. explain to me later.
perfect blue... sounds familiar..
Pygmalion 12-02-2003 08:52 PM
I saw an interview with him in Animerica (December, 2003 IIRC). I'm really eager to find a copy of Millenium Actress now. He looks like another fellow who wants to tell a story first, and doesn't feel obliged to use the anime cliches (like *cough*Miyazaki*cough*). To which I say, "YES! More like that, please."

Pygmalion
dawnstrider 12-03-2003 10:10 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Pygmalion
I saw an interview with him in Animerica (December, 2003 IIRC). I'm really eager to find a copy of Millenium Actress now. He looks like another fellow who wants to tell a story first, and doesn't feel obliged to use the anime cliches (like *cough*Miyazaki*cough*). To which I say, "YES! More like that, please."

Pygmalion


I know Smile ). That's what attracted me to his work. He doesn't seem like he's trying to sell; he wants to tell a good story from his - and, ultimately, Japan's - perspective. I like that fact that he essentially said (in a Newtype interview, Dec 2003) he doesn't write for the world, but he is glad that the world is getting the perspective of a Japanese artist in the early 21st century.

I really wish there were more like him; then I might be able to expand out of my rather narrow selection of anime likes Frown .

Bllue: Be sure to check your PMs later Wink .
animefan22 12-06-2003 06:56 PM
I think Satoshi kon is one of the most creative and inventive anime directors currently. Each movie he makes is just so different and unlike anything that's been done so far. But so far, Perfect Blue is still his masterpiece and best work. I've seen millenium actress and thought it was okay, i was expecting a lot more from it. It was too slow-moving and kinda boring at times. Perfect Blue on the other hand, is just brilliant. If you haven't seen it yet or any movies by satoshi kon, see this one!
Pygmalion 12-12-2003 11:53 PM
I've just finished watching this movie. If you think Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli is the pinnacle of anime (as I do), you may find that you need to widen your base to include Satoshi Kon.

His cinematography is excellent. The way he interlaces the present, past and film to depict the documentary of Chiyoko's life completely floored me. The films shown -- from medieval dramas to science fiction adventure -- depict the thousand years of the title.

I highly recommend it.

Pygmalion
dawnstrider 12-13-2003 12:08 AM
Thanks for the info Smile . Most references I could find for it are pretty vague when it comes to descriptions; of course, this movie is rather unorthodox Big Grin . I look forward to seeing it one day. I would also like to check out Tokyo Godfathers and some of his manga and live action movies, like this one about a yakuza leader who runs a hellish apartment building for illegal immigrants in Japan - no doubt also littered with deep social commentary Smile . I'm breaking out of my "anime shell", so to speak, and have an interest in two other series now, though one of them is a bit more "mainstream" then is usually to my liking Embarrassed Sweatdrop .
Bllue 12-14-2003 11:38 PM
from what ive heard those movies are pretty interesting. i cant wait until i can rent them once im old enough and i find out where to get them. then i'll have to make sure that my parents arent around to scrutinize my likings.
Pygmalion 12-14-2003 11:49 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Bllue
from what ive heard those movies are pretty interesting. i cant wait until i can rent them once im old enough and i find out where to get them. then i'll have to make sure that my parents arent around to scrutinize my likings.

Millenium Actress is rated PG for "thematic elements, violence, and brief mild language." If your parents are comfortable with the idea of animation on the order of Spirited Away, I don't think they'd have any objection to Millenium Actress. It is certainly less violent than Princess Mononoke.

Pygmalion
Lynnet 04-04-2004 06:51 PM
Perfect Blue is in my top 10 of really excellent movies I refuse to ever see again, along with Jin Roh and Dancer in the Dark. Scary. Very. It messed with my head.

It was so draining I avoided seeing Millenium Actress until today.

I'm sorry I waited so long. Of course the animation was beatiful, and the period detail was awesome (as was watching Kon dress up as a samurai for 'reference' purposes in 'The Making of...' hehe). It was kind of like a Japanese Radio Days. Very Sweet.
Khyron_Prime 04-04-2004 10:35 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Pygmalion
If you think Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli is the pinnacle of anime (as I do),

...then you need to get out more and stop buying into the American press' push of Hayao Miyazaki's work as if its the only Japanese animation worthy of widespread theatrical releases. Sorry for this, but Miyazaki gets way too much attention while directors like Satoshi Kon--who is not entirely overlooked--get the shaft when the possibility of coming to the United States market is presented.
Pygmalion 04-05-2004 07:27 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Negotiator Prime
...then you need to get out more and stop buying into the American press' push of Hayao Miyazaki's work as if its the only Japanese animation worthy of widespread theatrical releases. Sorry for this, but Miyazaki gets way too much attention while directors like Satoshi Kon--who is not entirely overlooked--get the shaft when the possibility of coming to the United States market is presented.

Very well sir, name names. Who are the other overlooked directors who can tell a story like Kon or Miyazaki?

This adulation of Miyazaki is only about ten years old, dating back to the English dub of Totoro. I've been an admirer of Miyazaki's works for over twenty years, so don't tell me my views have been molded by any jonny-come-lately press. I've seen a fair amount of anime, and most of it is nicely-drawn stuff with no more depth than an anime cel. Light entertainment.

Pygmalion

P.S. If Princess Mononoke was the first Miyazaki you saw, I can understand why you might have found it hard to take. There was an ambiguity and sadness about the film that makes it hard to like. And the carnage certainly made it a film for adults.
Barrin 04-05-2004 11:01 AM
No bi***ing over Miyazaki-san! Mad

Hayao Miyazaki is quite the anime genious. The fame for him is more than hype. My first expirience with his work was in Princess Mononoke and it is certainly praiseworthy. However, some of the fame around Spirited Away and such does seem overly focused on him alone, leaving out sudio Ghibli. I have seen Ghibli films with no involvemnet from Miyazaki (Grave of the Fireflies), and I have seen Miyazaki films he made before Ghibli was created (Lupin III: Castle of Cagliostro), and I can't get over how wonderful these people are. Still, I do keep my eyes open for other good works, such as Osamu Tezuki and Satoshi Kon. So, no yelling anything bad over Miyazaki. Cool
Lynnet 04-05-2004 06:49 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Barrin
No bi***ing over Miyazaki-san! Mad


Here, here.

It's not Miyazaki's fault that Dreamworks only subbed Millenium Actress and sent it straight to DVD.

Miyazaki's had his share of disrespect (Warriors of the Wind) and was so sick of having his work butchered it became a major event when Disney finally gained his trust.
Pygmalion 11-03-2005 10:49 AM
This third film from Satoshi Kon is his most comic one yet. Set at Christmas, it is filled with coincidences and miracles that could easily come off as hokey or contrived, but here look natural.

On Christmas Eve, while pawing through trash to find a suitable present for their teenaged companion, three homeless people find a crying baby, a note saying "take care of this child" and a locker key. At first, teenaged Miyuki and middle-aged Gin want to take the infant to the police station. Transvestite Hana won't hear of it. "It's my chance to be a mother, to give this child the love I never had."

When they find the locker that takes the key, there is a gym bag with photos and clothing. Could the parents have been running away? Or was this a suicide pact? Hana won't rest until he finds the mother and asks why the child was left in the garbage. His companions are dragged along by his enthusiasm, and by their own curiosity and concern for the infant.

As they search Tokyo for the location of the parents, they meet up with friends and relatives of their own, showing that even these homeless people are not as cut off from society as they may think. The end has a twist that has to be seen to be appreciated.

It's not necessary to see 3 Godfathers, Three Men and a Baby, or the two less-well-known versions from 1916 or 1936 -- but from what I remember of these movies, I can see the similarities. Suffice it to say that this version of a very old story is a Christmas tale well worth the viewing.

Pygmalion
BigPrime 11-03-2005 11:21 AM
Tokyo Godfathers was the first thing we showed at anime club this year. Great movie. Lots of laughs and a really good story.

Millennium Actress is definitely one of my favorites and I hope to get the chance to show it at club sometime this year as well.

All in all, I really like Satoshi Kon's work. He's definitely one of the best anime auteurs out there today.
Pygmalion 11-09-2006 09:16 AM
I found on YouTube a five-part study of the themes in Kon's work. Part One of "Millenium Key" lists common elements, which are explored in the other four videos: the heroine, the pair of investigators (one skeptical, one believing), the breakthrough of the fantastic storyline into the skeptical investigator's worldview, and the shifting realities within the work. This is an interesting take on one of my favorite animation artists.

Pygmalion
Nine Kuze 11-09-2006 12:08 PM
I haven't seen any of his movies but if their anything like the series he directed, Paranoia Agent, then I'd really like to check them out.

Fun fact: Satoshi Kon was nominated for an Animated Award in Directing for Paranoia Agent last year.

...Shameless plug ftw. Big Grin
Peace.
David Ryder 11-09-2006 05:31 PM
I'm going to be the black sheep once again. I find Mr. Kon to be extremely overrated, much like his films.
Pygmalion 01-18-2007 09:32 PM
quote:
Originally posted by David Ryder
I'm going to be the black sheep once again. I find Mr. Kon to be extremely overrated, much like his films.

I guess that makes sense. If his films disappoint, then it would be hard to get excited about the artist. But please, give more detail. What were you expecting that you didn't get?

Pygmalion