Roger Smith sleeps til midday. Why?

DorothyFan1 12-08-2006 11:41 PM
I've always wondered if there's a symbolic meaning to Roger Smith sleeping til midday in Paradigm City. Is this to emphasize his nighttime life, partying til the wee hours of the morning...or is this some weird habit that Roger Smith has somehow picked up? Oh...I also have to wonder about the connection between Roger's sleeping habits and the fateful day in Act 26?

In Act 26...almost all the events happened in the MORNING...which is usually Roger Smith's sleeping time. I find this significant because it was during this time of the day that Roger Smith was somehow vulnerable to Big Fau. However...the fascinating thing to discover is that R.Dorothy's memories...in Big Fau...was always in vertical mode in Fau...until R.Dorothy rescues Roger Smith. After this...Big Fau's memory chip (R.Dorothy's mind) suddenly reverts to the 12 o'clock position...which is Roger Smith's waking time.

I think Roger Smith's sleeping habits are a clue to what happened on The Event "40 years ago".
evanASF27 12-09-2006 12:09 AM
....He sleeps in....

Welcome to New York City! The city that never sleeps....except for Roger Smith, who gets the luxury to do so (once in a while).

quote:
However...the fascinating thing to discover is that R.Dorothy's memories...in Big Fau...was always in vertical mode in Fau...until R.Dorothy rescues Roger Smith. After this...Big Fau's memory chip (R.Dorothy's mind) suddenly reverts to the 12 o'clock position...which is Roger Smith's waking time

You mean "Horizontal". <------> is horizontal (like the horizon of the sky)
And when the core is turned 90 degrees, it appears to be like a hour-glass with the sands of time running out (and the imbalance of who's in control of Big Fau: Rosewater or itself.)

There's more symbolism in the core memories being shaped like an hourglass (which Roger collects, and also represent the passage of time).

Unfortunately, the fact that Roger "sleeps in" cannot be used as any pivotal plot clue since it was most likely introduced as either comedic happenstance or to show that Roger is a normal schmoe like everyone else (which was then used to usher in Dorothy's piano skills, R.Instro, etc.). Aside from introducing a character, exploring Dorothy's musical abilities, and creating the circumstances leading up to the arrival of Constanze... the mid-day wakeup is nothing more than what it is: waking up in the middle of the day.
Generalissimo D 12-09-2006 10:58 AM
...He's a lazy american.

Thats pretty much it.
Big Big Moon 12-09-2006 11:51 AM
You'd sleep till noon every day too if you had a full breakfast and a Megadeus in your basement waiting for you.
Nazrael 12-09-2006 01:43 PM
The tipped hourglass of Dorothy's memories was meant to say that Alex has let everything go. It turns red and very quicky begins to empty into the lower container. I think it has more to do with saying that Big Fau and Alex's time was up. Because when Venus takes them away, the hour glass has emptied.

I think Roger just likes to stay up late to think. In some scenes at night they show him looking out the balcony with a glass of wine just staring off into space.
David Ryder 12-09-2006 03:30 PM
He likes to sleep in? Honestly, that's pretty much the best anwser if ya ask me.
Valdoom 12-09-2006 06:47 PM
"Your overthinking this, aren't you?"
StevieV019 12-09-2006 10:23 PM
Because he's dope like that...
Shadow dorothy 12-10-2006 09:57 AM
Did anyone ever notice that R.Dorothy mind looks like an hour glass, and that Roger loves hour glasses.
Nazrael 12-10-2006 01:22 PM
Err...That wasn't Dorothy's mind. Her memories were in her hard drive, they were put into a device that looked like an hour-glass, the device allowed Fau to substitute it for its core memory.
Shadow dorothy 12-10-2006 09:54 PM
Whatever, her memories then. But if all the Megadii have core memories then how come we only see Big Fau's and not Big O's or Big Duo?
Sharpshooter005 12-11-2006 02:18 AM
Hangover.
Nine Kuze 12-11-2006 02:24 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Sharpshooter005
Hangover.

You know how Big Ear gets when he gets that Grey Goose in his system.

Everybody in this Speakeasy gettin tipsy.
Peace.
spiked-knives 12-14-2006 02:00 PM
Hmmm.....this isn't really anything to specific to Roger's sleeping habits, but note that Roger always does have Hour Glasses in his house, Dorthy's core memory looked like any hour glass? Connection? maybe?


even if their was a connection, what would it mean? When the hour glass runs out, so does paradigm's lifespan?


any thoughts?
Schwarzwald_X 12-14-2006 02:51 PM
Well.... i like to sleep long into the day.... does that give me an air of mystique and symbolism?

I think he's just a lazy bum, and his sleeping habits exemplify the lax part of his personality.
paul1290 12-14-2006 02:53 PM
It's probably to symbolize the passage of time. The passing of time happens to be a very important theme in Big-O.

(There are also an unusual number of clocks featured in the series.)
The Question 12-14-2006 02:59 PM
He's a rich boy, he does it because he can.
Big Big Moon 12-14-2006 05:35 PM
quote:
It's probably to symbolize the passage of time. The passing of time happens to be a very important theme in Big-O.


Indeed. This is very appropriate for a city built around a period of time (40 years ago) that is constantly rushing towards an inevitable conclusion, which also introduces the motif of fate: Alex is constantly going on about him being a successor to fate as his father's son, Roger describes people who defy things they cannot control (going out in the rain without an umbrella) and seems determined to establish his own identity regardless of the past, as well as maintaining a firm belief that his 40-years-ago counterpart chose his fate willingly... all the while, Schwarzwald compares Paradigm to a stage production that, like all plays, must have an ending; this creates a balance between three perspectives on fate: those who accept and fulfill their inability to change destiny, those who defy their destiny at all costs, and the neutral third-party observer who only desires the truth of the situation.

How appropriate for Michael Seebach to be a journalist! How appropriate that the three wielders of fate are also the three wielders of the power of God Wink
Nine Kuze 12-15-2006 12:41 PM
...If we start getting threads about how Norman's moustache is the underlying catalyst of the war that we witness through the flashbacks between the megadeuses, then I think things would have gotten out of hand by then.
Peace.
paul1290 12-15-2006 07:56 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Big Big Moon
quote:
It's probably to symbolize the passage of time. The passing of time happens to be a very important theme in Big-O.


Indeed. This is very appropriate for a city built around a period of time (40 years ago) that is constantly rushing towards an inevitable conclusion, which also introduces the motif of fate: Alex is constantly going on about him being a successor to fate as his father's son, Roger describes people who defy things they cannot control (going out in the rain without an umbrella) and seems determined to establish his own identity regardless of the past, as well as maintaining a firm belief that his 40-years-ago counterpart chose his fate willingly... all the while, Schwarzwald compares Paradigm to a stage production that, like all plays, must have an ending; this creates a balance between three perspectives on fate: those who accept and fulfill their inability to change destiny, those who defy their destiny at all costs, and the neutral third-party observer who only desires the truth of the situation.

How appropriate for Michael Seebach to be a journalist! How appropriate that the three wielders of fate are also the three wielders of the power of God Wink


Well actually I meant the hourglasses, but that works too. Big Grin