Airman Patsai has returned

Patsai 09-17-2006 11:27 AM


Hey everyone I'm back and after seven rough tough weeks I've finally earned the title of becoming an Airman. Basic Training was fun, trust me. A typical day was waking up at 0445, falling out for Reville (singing the Air Force song), going to Physical Readiness Training (they made us yell "I love the Pain Train!" when we did our push ups), then eating breakfast while getting yelled at with minimal time to eat, going back up to our dorms (they're set up like Marine barracks, so don't let the word fool you) while getting yelled at for not getting your beds laser-precision made (it's harder to do then it seems), going out to drill practice at 90 degree Texas temperature (I've been called retard and stupid ass many times throughout Basic by my Military Training Instructors), going to lunch and get yelled at some more, going out for parade practice, going to classes (the only time we won't get yelled at...usually), then go down for dinner, get yelled at some more, go back up to the dorms and organize our dormitories (again, ridiculous standards for folding towels and rolling shirts, etc.) and going to bed at 2100. If we're lucky, we won't get woken up in the middle of the night.

The worst part of BMT was really just the lack of sleep. Our MTI woke us up one night to get us to line up in formation outside, and if we mess up we'd be sent back upstairs ("Go away, retards!") then ten minutes into it when we'd just be drifting off into sleep, we were woken up again to do it. We got it finally right our eleventh time.

I honestly love BMT though. For how much they pushed us, I learned a hell of a lot. The only truely difficult thing about BMT now was the new standard for the final excercise test, which is 45 PERFECT push-ups and 50 PERFECT sit-ups in under a minute, and running 1.5 miles in 11:56 or less. Doesn't sound hard at first, but you'd be surprised how many people actually didn't pass when it came around. Just a month ago, the standards were the same, only you had two minutes to do it. Now that they've changed these standards, we technically are more demanding physically than the Marines. Sure the Marines have their 10 mile Cruscible, but the Air Force really is cracking down on fitness, and they're discharging people (20,000 need to be discharged this year) for being unfit.

Our Traning Instructors (the mean looking fellow with the odd-shaped cowboy hat) are not allowed to swear, but they are so good at chewing you out, you'll feel small by the time they're done with you. Trust me, I felt SMALL when I had my first week's encounter with them. And no matter how much you try not to stand out, you will stand out. They have eyes behind their backs, and because my freedoms were severely limited in BMT, I had to watch everything I did or I would have my butt on a platter.

The first couple weeks in BMT, I did pretty much anything wrong, because military life was different. I got it eventually drilled into me, and the discipline that comes from just doing drills stays with you for a lifetime. At the end of it all, you'll be wanting to shake your MTI's hand for what he's done for you. I definitely felt like it.

Everyone's cried in BMT. Even the big guy who's arms can't fit through his blue sleeves. That was when we went to church for the first time (first Sunday) and when we were at the Airman's Coin Ceremony (Last Monday of BMT). Before we were given our Airman's coin and officially called Airman we were "Trainees" and the chicks were called "felmale". Whenever we talked to someone higher than us (which was basically everybody, even civilians), we had to give reporting statements. "Sir, Trainee (Dum Dum) reports as ordered". It was drilled into us that even after BMT when we weren't required to say it anymore I would say it on occassion to a waitress or someone similar.

I'd go into more detail about it later, but I just wanted to hop on and say hello again to PCF and to tell you all that I'm still alive. I've got a lot of hilarious stories to tell, just not enough time to do it. I'll be on when I can during the weekends because it's my off-duty time, but hope everything still rolls well.

FLIGHT!
TENCH-HUT!
FORWARD
HARCH!
David Ryder 09-17-2006 11:40 AM
Ah, welcome back Patsai. Glad to hear everything is ok.
088nd 09-17-2006 11:43 AM
Sounds like you're having a good time man. Wink

Are you living on base right now?
Patsai 09-17-2006 11:48 AM
quote:
Originally posted by 088nd
Are you living on base right now?


Yes, sir. I'm currently attending tech school learning my new job at Lackland AFB, TX. It's in the heart of San Antonio, basically the same place I got my Basic Training. I still hear "Hut, Two, Three, Fow, Hut, Two, Three Fow!" in the distance. The dormitories here are much nicer (think Raddisson hotel), and we got some of our freedoms back, like we can eat what we want now and smile! Big Grin

After I finish tech school I plan on going home on leave and doing RAP (Recruiter's Assistance Program) before going to my first permanent duty station, which I hope will be Luke AFB, AZ.
Chitter-Box-Kat 09-17-2006 12:04 PM
WOW. Shocked Scary.

Hey, glad to see you're alive and well. Big Grin We got buttloads of new members, and some cool stuff happened. I can't wait to hear the funny stories.
Travis Bickle 09-17-2006 04:54 PM
Good to hear you're well. I hope you found hapiness as well.
Pie_Junkie 09-17-2006 07:00 PM
Wow, can't wait for when I get to join.
R.Smith 09-17-2006 07:08 PM
First off congratulations on graduating! Thumbs Up

Sounds like a tough but rewarding time you had.


Glad things went well for you. Big Grin
Generalissimo D 09-17-2006 07:39 PM
Maybe you can become a seaman later in life?
Nine Kuze 09-18-2006 11:56 AM
Cool to see you stop by, Patsai and I like the pic too. Lookin' very professional.

Nice to hear what do did during training and sounds grand, except for all the yelling. Knowing me, I'd yell back and then it would only get interesting from there.

Also, the final exercise test sounds fun. I'd like to try that sometime.

Good to see you had a helluva time, bruh. Stop by again when you're able to.
Peace.
Patsai 09-18-2006 06:24 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Nine XXVI
Nice to hear what do did during training and sounds grand, except for all the yelling. Knowing me, I'd yell back and then it would only get interesting from there.


Thanks, but do you honestly want to know? The fastest way out of Basic Training is graduating, if you get injured or doing something wrong/stupid, you're only going to stay there longer. I've known someone to have been there since March (placed in the Psychiatric Squadron as a "crazy") and they're still there. And it's only because they yelled back to a M.T.I.
Nine Kuze 09-19-2006 05:16 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Patsai
quote:
Originally posted by Nine XXVI
Nice to hear what do did during training and sounds grand, except for all the yelling. Knowing me, I'd yell back and then it would only get interesting from there.


Thanks, but do you honestly want to know? The fastest way out of Basic Training is graduating, if you get injured or doing something wrong/stupid, you're only going to stay there longer. I've known someone to have been there since March (placed in the Psychiatric Squadron as a "crazy") and they're still there. And it's only because they yelled back to a M.T.I.

That's ingenious. They make you stay longer if you talk back smack. That's pretty damn slick.

Cool to hear you doing alright in school at the moment and don't take smiling for granted. Big Grin
Peace.
paul1290 09-19-2006 06:41 PM
Welcome back Airman Patsai!

Good to see you're alive and well. Big Grin
Volt 09-21-2006 06:20 PM
Congrats, man! It sounds like it was pretty hellish, but it takes a real man to go through that sort of stuff and not give out. Good job.
Patsai 10-03-2006 09:35 PM
Hellish? It was tough, but I wouldn't say it was equivalent to going to hell. I suppose to some, because I know there were a few who tried to commit suicide, but it's not what you do in Basic Training that proves who you are, it only reveals to you what you are capable of from within, but how you use it when you are actually out in Operations will it then truely decide if you are a man. My Military Training Instructor, while he did chew us out, gave us true inspiration when he brought his family in. His nine year old and six year old boy, and his wife, saying that this was what was worth fighting for, what was worth dying for. Brought a tear to my eye.