The best arena rock vocalist?

NightRanger 06-05-2005 02:09 PM
I'm a HUGE fan of Arena Rock, and the genre has had ALOT of great singers. I am a BIG fan of all the choices in this poll, but I'm not sure who's the best of the bunch. I'll get back to ya on that.
Travis Bickle 06-05-2005 02:23 PM
See...I remeber reading back in the day how STP and other grunge and alternative bands were labled as Arena Rock, but it was a terrible mistake made by the media. Arena rock is mostly heard when describing hair metal bands. And, since I'm not a big fan of hair metal bands, I voted other (and by other, I mean none).

However, that's just my opinion.
NightRanger 06-05-2005 04:04 PM
Actually, Arena Rock is used to describe bands like Styx, Foreigner, REO Speedwagon, Journey, Night Ranger, Boston, etc.
Mike 06-05-2005 04:16 PM
This list lacks Bruce Dickinson. That makes me sad.
BethMcBeth 06-05-2005 04:46 PM
Yeah I also really liked Billy Corgan, from smashing Pumpkins.

-Beth
Travis Bickle 06-05-2005 05:07 PM
quote:
Originally posted by NightRanger
Actually, Arena Rock is used to describe bands like Styx, Foreigner, REO Speedwagon, Journey, Night Ranger, Boston, etc.


...as well as hair metal bands. Do a Google search for Hair Metal Arena Rock and you'll probobly get a lot of results on how certain bands (Def Leopard, Whitesnake, etc.) were arena rock bands. Also, I know for a fact that, in Rolling Stone's articles on hair metal that randomly pop in their issues at least once a year, they refer to most hair metal bands as Arena Rock bands as well. I'm not trying to exclude the bands that you just mentioned (though, IMO, I don't really care for them).

quote:
Originally posted by BethMcBeth
Yeah I also really liked Billy Corgan, from smashing Pumpkins.

-Beth


And if you read what I wrote:

quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
See...I remeber reading back in the day how STP and other grunge and alternative bands were labled as Arena Rock, but it was a terrible mistake made by the media…


You’d realize that the Smashing Pumpkins are far from an arena rock band. Trust me. I saw them live. Smile
Tony Waynewrong 06-06-2005 01:37 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
quote:
Originally posted by BethMcBeth
Yeah I also really liked Billy Corgan, from smashing Pumpkins.

-Beth


And if you read what I wrote:

quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
See...I remeber reading back in the day how STP and other grunge and alternative bands were labled as Arena Rock, but it was a terrible mistake made by the media…


You’d realize that the Smashing Pumpkins are far from an arena rock band. Trust me. I saw them live. Smile


Funny that you mentioned it, I have seen them in concert too. I thought they rocked better than many of their studio performances. Then again, that's just my opinion. Big Grin
Travis Bickle 06-06-2005 07:50 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
quote:
Originally posted by BethMcBeth
Yeah I also really liked Billy Corgan, from smashing Pumpkins.

-Beth


And if you read what I wrote:

quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
See...I remeber reading back in the day how STP and other grunge and alternative bands were labled as Arena Rock, but it was a terrible mistake made by the media…


You’d realize that the Smashing Pumpkins are far from an arena rock band. Trust me. I saw them live. Smile


Funny that you mentioned it, I have seen them in concert too. I thought they rocked better than many of their studio performances. Then again, that's just my opinion. Big Grin


Ok. However, that doesn't make them an arena rock band...
Mike 06-06-2005 08:12 AM
Go see the Motley Crue Reunion Tour. Big extravagant elaborate stage show. THAT is arena rock.
Tony Waynewrong 06-06-2005 08:51 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
quote:
Originally posted by BethMcBeth
Yeah I also really liked Billy Corgan, from smashing Pumpkins.

-Beth


And if you read what I wrote:

quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
See...I remeber reading back in the day how STP and other grunge and alternative bands were labled as Arena Rock, but it was a terrible mistake made by the media…


You’d realize that the Smashing Pumpkins are far from an arena rock band. Trust me. I saw them live. Smile


Funny that you mentioned it, I have seen them in concert too. I thought they rocked better than many of their studio performances. Then again, that's just my opinion. Big Grin


Ok. However, that doesn't make them an arena rock band...


I am not entirely sure of that. During their third album (Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness), they were considered an arena rock band by many critics. In fact, it really started before that, but I won't split hairs.
Travis Bickle 06-06-2005 09:22 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
I am not entirely sure of that. During their third album (Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness), they were considered an arena rock band by many critics. In fact, it really started before that, but I won't split hairs.


Well, since part of the NYC leg of the Mellon Collie tour was actually one of my first real concert experiences (my cousin Neil, who used to work at KROCK in NYC, actually pulled me out of middle school and told my mother he was taking me to a museum), allow me to retort.

Arena rock could be used to describe two aspects of music: the 80s acts that were pretty much (in the best way I could describe it) "heavy metal for pansies", such as Van Halen and the vast majority of hair metal bands, as well as acts that Night Ranger listed (which fall along a similar line).

It could, say, also describe bands that play giant arena, such as Madison Square Garden or Giant Stadium (an arena, if I may). And, since the Pumpkins did play in quite a few of these places, does that make them an arena rock band? If so, then I think you should throw the Beatles, the Stones, and pretty much every other band that has sold out massive venues. The term Arena Rock is very vauge.

Now, am I aware that the media has labeled the Pumpkins as Arena Rock? Yes I am. However, it's a terribly misconstrued opinion. All of this coming from a giant group of indiviudals who labeled At The Drive-In as Alternative Rock and say that Like A Rolling Stone is the greatest song known to man.

In Billy Corgan's opinion in the recent Entertainment Weekly, if I do recall (as well as my opinion), the Pumpkins were pretty much the model for alternative rock as it is today. And since that came from his mouth, I guess I can't argue.

-Scott
Tony Waynewrong 06-06-2005 09:36 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
I am not entirely sure of that. During their third album (Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness), they were considered an arena rock band by many critics. In fact, it really started before that, but I won't split hairs.


Well, since part of the NYC leg of the Mellon Collie tour was actually one of my first real concert experiences (my cousin Neil, who used to work at KROCK in NYC, actually pulled me out of middle school and told my mother he was taking me to a museum), allow me to retort.

Arena rock could be used to describe two aspects of music: the 80s acts that were pretty much (in the best way I could describe it) "heavy metal for pansies", such as Van Halen and the vast majority of hair metal bands, as well as acts that Night Ranger listed (which fall along a similar line).

It could, say, also describe bands that play giant arena, such as Madison Square Garden or Giant Stadium (an arena, if I may). And, since the Pumpkins did play in quite a few of these places, does that make them an arena rock band? If so, then I think you should throw the Beatles, the Stones, and pretty much every other band that has sold out massive venues. The term Arena Rock is very vauge.

In Billy Corgan's opinion in the recent Entertainment Weekly, if I do recall (as well as my opinion), the Pumpkins were pretty much the model for alternative rock as it is today. And since that came from his mouth, I guess I can't argue.

-Scott


I totally agree that the term "Arena Rock" is very vague. In fact, I have read 5 different definitions, trying to narrow it down. If you are using Answers.Com's definition, then you are partially correct. Bands of the 70's, like Queen, Boston, and so on where called "Arena Rock Bands."
Travis Bickle 06-06-2005 09:39 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
I am not entirely sure of that. During their third album (Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness), they were considered an arena rock band by many critics. In fact, it really started before that, but I won't split hairs.


Well, since part of the NYC leg of the Mellon Collie tour was actually one of my first real concert experiences (my cousin Neil, who used to work at KROCK in NYC, actually pulled me out of middle school and told my mother he was taking me to a museum), allow me to retort.

Arena rock could be used to describe two aspects of music: the 80s acts that were pretty much (in the best way I could describe it) "heavy metal for pansies", such as Van Halen and the vast majority of hair metal bands, as well as acts that Night Ranger listed (which fall along a similar line).

It could, say, also describe bands that play giant arena, such as Madison Square Garden or Giant Stadium (an arena, if I may). And, since the Pumpkins did play in quite a few of these places, does that make them an arena rock band? If so, then I think you should throw the Beatles, the Stones, and pretty much every other band that has sold out massive venues. The term Arena Rock is very vauge.

In Billy Corgan's opinion in the recent Entertainment Weekly, if I do recall (as well as my opinion), the Pumpkins were pretty much the model for alternative rock as it is today. And since that came from his mouth, I guess I can't argue.

-Scott


I totally agree that the term "Arena Rock" is very vague. In fact, I have read 5 different definitions, trying to narrow it down. If you are using Answers.Com's definition, then you are partially correct. Bands of the 70's, like Queen, Boston, and so on where called "Arena Rock Bands."


Thus helps prove my point. The Pumpkins aren't an arena rock band. In fact, there is no concrete definition of arena rock (as you just helped me point out).
Tony Waynewrong 06-06-2005 04:47 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
I am not entirely sure of that. During their third album (Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness), they were considered an arena rock band by many critics. In fact, it really started before that, but I won't split hairs.


Well, since part of the NYC leg of the Mellon Collie tour was actually one of my first real concert experiences (my cousin Neil, who used to work at KROCK in NYC, actually pulled me out of middle school and told my mother he was taking me to a museum), allow me to retort.

Arena rock could be used to describe two aspects of music: the 80s acts that were pretty much (in the best way I could describe it) "heavy metal for pansies", such as Van Halen and the vast majority of hair metal bands, as well as acts that Night Ranger listed (which fall along a similar line).

It could, say, also describe bands that play giant arena, such as Madison Square Garden or Giant Stadium (an arena, if I may). And, since the Pumpkins did play in quite a few of these places, does that make them an arena rock band? If so, then I think you should throw the Beatles, the Stones, and pretty much every other band that has sold out massive venues. The term Arena Rock is very vauge.

In Billy Corgan's opinion in the recent Entertainment Weekly, if I do recall (as well as my opinion), the Pumpkins were pretty much the model for alternative rock as it is today. And since that came from his mouth, I guess I can't argue.

-Scott


I totally agree that the term "Arena Rock" is very vague. In fact, I have read 5 different definitions, trying to narrow it down. If you are using Answers.Com's definition, then you are partially correct. Bands of the 70's, like Queen, Boston, and so on where called "Arena Rock Bands."


Thus helps prove my point. The Pumpkins aren't an arena rock band. In fact, there is no concrete definition of arena rock (as you just helped me point out).


Actually, I believe you mave have misread what I said. I said, "If you are using Answers.Com's definition, then you are partially correct." However, there are different definitions, some contradictionary to that presented by Answers.com. So, you are partially right (if you are going by what answers.com). That's all I am saying.

According to some other definitions, Arena Rock groups are groups that are highly commercialized and are arena fillers; who's roots are that of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. If that's the case, then the Smashing Pumpkins can be considered an Arena Rock Band. It's really up the beholder, I guess (since, there isn't a true definition, as of now).
Travis Bickle 06-06-2005 04:59 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
quote:
Originally posted by Tony
I am not entirely sure of that. During their third album (Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness), they were considered an arena rock band by many critics. In fact, it really started before that, but I won't split hairs.


Well, since part of the NYC leg of the Mellon Collie tour was actually one of my first real concert experiences (my cousin Neil, who used to work at KROCK in NYC, actually pulled me out of middle school and told my mother he was taking me to a museum), allow me to retort.

Arena rock could be used to describe two aspects of music: the 80s acts that were pretty much (in the best way I could describe it) "heavy metal for pansies", such as Van Halen and the vast majority of hair metal bands, as well as acts that Night Ranger listed (which fall along a similar line).

It could, say, also describe bands that play giant arena, such as Madison Square Garden or Giant Stadium (an arena, if I may). And, since the Pumpkins did play in quite a few of these places, does that make them an arena rock band? If so, then I think you should throw the Beatles, the Stones, and pretty much every other band that has sold out massive venues. The term Arena Rock is very vauge.

In Billy Corgan's opinion in the recent Entertainment Weekly, if I do recall (as well as my opinion), the Pumpkins were pretty much the model for alternative rock as it is today. And since that came from his mouth, I guess I can't argue.

-Scott


I totally agree that the term "Arena Rock" is very vague. In fact, I have read 5 different definitions, trying to narrow it down. If you are using Answers.Com's definition, then you are partially correct. Bands of the 70's, like Queen, Boston, and so on where called "Arena Rock Bands."


Thus helps prove my point. The Pumpkins aren't an arena rock band. In fact, there is no concrete definition of arena rock (as you just helped me point out).


Actually, I believe you mave have misread what I said. I said, "If you are using Answers.Com's definition, then you are partially correct." However, there are different definitions, some contradictionary to that presented by Answers.com. So, you are partially right (if you are going by what answers.com). That's all I am saying.

According to some other definitions, Arena Rock groups are groups that are highly commercialized and are arena fillers; who's roots are that of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. If that's the case, then the Smashing Pumpkins can be considered an Arena Rock Band. It's really up the beholder, I guess (since, there isn't a true definition, as of now).


Who died and made Answers.Com robot king? In fact, thanks for telling me about it. It's the first time I've heard about it. Reminds me of the time I wrote a 12 page essay using only sources from Wikipedia...

The majority of the definitions classify Arena Rock as Phil Collins (take that, Genesis) and Whitesnake nonsense. However, during the 90's the media had to be an ass and go out of there way and say "OMG! TEH GRUNGE AND TEH ALTERNATIVE ROCK IS TEH ARENA ROCK! (woo woo)", or someting similar.

So, judging by what you say with other sources (which I know is true, since I've seen in in local newspapers, Spin, etc.), I guess that if I, say, got a band together and we broke into MSG and started playing on the stage there (and there were lots of people in the audience), we would be an Arena Rock band? Hmm...

How about let's leave it to the artists to decide what genre they are, and not the journalists who judge everything by what's currently on the Top 40.

If Billy Corgan somehow one day says that the Pumpkins were an arena rock band, then I'll shut up already. However, until he does (which he won't), I think we should cease disccusion on the subject immediately. It's for the greater good. Smile

-Scott
StevieV019 06-07-2005 06:52 AM
Roll Eyes

Arena Rock bands:
Van Halen
Bon Jovi
Motley Crue
Styx
Foreigner
Def Leppard
etc. etc.

NON-arena rock bands:
Smashing Pumpkins
Pearl Jam
Nirvana


Basically, the "literal" definition of an arena rock band is the one that Tony mentioned above. However, generally speaking, and the definition that most musically inclined fans go by is this: arena rock bands were the bands from the 70's and 80's (and early 90's) throughout the "glam metal" and hair band days. They are the bands that belted out loud, flamboyant guitar riffs, added with loud and high pitched vocals. Instead of a performance, these concerts became parties on stage to some extent...Yes, Smashing Pumpkins played arenas, as did Pearl Jam at some point in time. However, as an example, those two bands are typically categorized as alternative rock, which roots came from a culture and community that played coffee houses and local gigs. After their sounds and popularity grew, they started playing larger venues, in which case, due to demand, they started playing arenas. Despite their rise in popularity, they still remained true to their origins and kept their alternative rock roots, as opposed to putting together a party on stage, like most hair and glam bands did during the height of the arena rock band craze. That does not, however, classify them as "arena rock bands"...they are still considered alternative rock.

If we are going to categorize that any band that played a large arena as an arena band, I think the point of this discussion has been misconstrued and mistaken. If thats the case, didnt Nobuo Uematsu and his orchestra play large venues at some point? If so, well rock on, because he must be considered an arena rock entertainer with his "arena rock" band in tow...

Point being, just because you play a large arena, it doesnt make the band an arena rock band...
Travis Bickle 06-07-2005 07:06 AM
quote:
Originally posted by StevieV019
Roll Eyes

Arena Rock bands:
Van Halen
Bon Jovi
Motley Crue
Styx
Foreigner
Def Leppard
etc. etc.

NON-arena rock bands:
Smashing Pumpkins
Pearl Jam
Nirvana


Basically, the "literal" definition of an arena rock band is the one that Tony mentioned above. However, generally speaking, and the definition that most musically inclined fans go by is this: arena rock bands were the bands from the 70's and 80's (and early 90's) throughout the "glam metal" and hair band days. They are the bands that belted out loud, flamboyant guitar riffs, added with loud and high pitched vocals. Instead of a performance, these concerts became parties on stage to some extent...Yes, Smashing Pumpkins played arenas, as did Pearl Jam at some point in time. However, as an example, those two bands are typically categorized as alternative rock, which roots came from a culture and community that played coffee houses and local gigs. After their sounds and popularity grew, they started playing larger venues, in which case, due to demand, they started playing arenas. Despite their rise in popularity, they still remained true to their origins and kept their alternative rock roots, as opposed to putting together a party on stage, like most hair and glam bands did during the height of the arena rock band craze. That does not, however, classify them as "arena rock bands"...they are still considered alternative rock.

If we are going to categorize that any band that played a large arena as an arena band, I think the point of this discussion has been misconstrued and mistaken. If thats the case, didnt Nobuo Uematsu and his orchestra play large venues at some point? If so, well rock on, because he must be considered an arena rock entertainer with his "arena rock" band in tow...

Point being, just because you play a large arena, it doesnt make the band an arena rock band...


It couldn't be put any better. Bravo, Stevie!
TanookiJoe 06-07-2005 10:53 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Bleedthrough
Reminds me of the time I wrote a 12 page essay using only sources from Wikipedia...


Someone actually let you do that? I guess they aren't very aware of what Wikipedia is...

It would have been helpful if what bands each vocalist belonged to was listed on the poll.