Robert A. Heinlein

Ace of Spades 04-03-2005 02:59 PM
After reading some of the books this guy wrote I can see why people call him The Grandmaster of Science Fiction. Focusing his novels around aspects such as what it truly means to be human, the theory of there being multiple universes, and The Future's History. Some of his best written works in my view are.

-Starship Troopers
-Stranger in a Strange Land
-Number of the Beast
-The Cat who walks through Walls
-Logic of Empire
-The Man who sold the Moon

I strongly recommend these books if you're interested in Sci-Fi and the Paranormal.
Zopwx2 04-03-2005 03:10 PM
I've only read stranger in a strange land and it started off good but got really lame towards the end.

I plan on reading starship troopers though.

P.S. Asimov is the grandmaster... or Herbert but mostly Asimov. Big Grin
Lady Tesser 04-03-2005 04:11 PM
'Number of the Beast' rules the field! One of the ultimate crossover novels - fans of Alan Moore's graphic novels 'League of Extraordinary Gentlemen' will be pleased.

Also recommend 'Have Spacesuit, Will Travel' (young adult), 'Podkayne of Mars' (young adult, chick book - sorta), 'The Rolling Stones' (young adult), 'Double Star', 'Time Enough for Love' (Future History), and 'To Sail Beyond the Sunset' (last of the Future History).

The man knew his history, knew how to work logical extrapolation for alternate histories, understood the quirks of culture, understood and explored the math of space travel, wrote strong and intelligent female characters in a time when females were expected to be fainting/screaming princesses, was one of the first sci-fi authors to give his characters genitals, did not fall into the 'Sci-Fi Utopia' trap of perfect societies in his work, argued for individual rights, focused on the characterization just as much as the technology and physics, AND designed the waterbed.

His books will NEVER translate to movies properly because of the sheer amount of inflection and hard science involved. Except for his 'young adult' novels, I can't see any of them being made for the screen.

Although I think his novella 'Gulf' (from his collection 'Assignment in Eternity') has a very good chance of being made into a mini-series with the right screenwriter and director.
Pygmalion 04-03-2005 06:05 PM
If you like nuts-and-bolts science fiction, pre-Stranger In a Strange Land Heinlein is your man. After that book, he seemed to be impossible to edit, and his books got bigger and less plausible over time.

My favorites:
Have Space Suit, Will Travel
The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
Starship Troopers (doesn't have much in common with the movie)
The Rolling Stones
Red Planet
The Man Who Sold the Moon
and most of his short stories, including his Boy Scout stories and his "Future History" (collected in The Past Through Tomorrow)

Pygmalion

[edit] Daniel M. Ryan has good descriptions of all the Heinlein juvenile novels.
Travis Bickle 04-03-2005 06:22 PM
I liked Stranger in a Strange Land. However, Phillip K. Dick is still the grandmaster of all that is Science Fiction.
A Clockwork Tomato 04-03-2005 06:29 PM
Have Space Suit, Will Travel, is Heinlein's best book, in my opinion. I greatly admire its opening paragraph:

"You see, I had this space suit."

Though my favorite fantasy and SF writer is and always will be Jack Vance. I especially recommend his book, The Night Lamp, which, like most of his books, blurs the distinction between fantasy, science fiction, and horror.
BigPrime 04-03-2005 06:31 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Zopwx2
P.S. Asimov is the grandmaster... or Herbert but mostly Asimov. Big Grin


Technically speaking, all three have been granted the title of Grand Master by some sci-fi literary society or some such, and for good reason. They're all truly great authors. I think Clarke is also one (possibly the only living one, I can't remember any others).

I've only read Stranger.. and Starship Troopers and loved both of them. I've meant to read more over the years, but I've never gotten around to it.
Darth Nat 04-06-2005 03:38 PM
Starship Troopers is probably one of my favorite books ever. I love military-themed sci-fi books, so the book was right up my alley. I really need to re-read it, though...

I've never read another Heinlein book, though. Maybe I should pick one up one of these days.
TanookiJoe 04-06-2005 06:50 PM
quote:
Originally posted by BigPrime
quote:
Originally posted by Zopwx2
P.S. Asimov is the grandmaster... or Herbert but mostly Asimov. Big Grin


Technically speaking, all three have been granted the title of Grand Master by some sci-fi literary society or some such, and for good reason. They're all truly great authors. I think Clarke is also one (possibly the only living one, I can't remember any others).

I've only read Stranger.. and Starship Troopers and loved both of them. I've meant to read more over the years, but I've never gotten around to it.


I vaguely remember looking at a list that included Sci-Fi Grandmasters and I could've sworn there was at least other on the list. My mind seems to think it was something that started with a B... (And it wasn't Bradbury, though he may also have been on the list, though I'm not sure).

This is gonna bug me.

I've only read The Man Who Sold the Moon concerning Heinlein.
Pygmalion 04-06-2005 10:19 PM
quote:
Originally posted by TanookiJoe

I vaguely remember looking at a list that included Sci-Fi Grandmasters and I could've sworn there was at least other on the list. My mind seems to think it was something that started with a B... (And it wasn't Bradbury, though he may also have been on the list, though I'm not sure).

James Blish, perhaps?

Pygmalion
6 moon dance 06-02-2005 11:03 PM
Heinlein's Door Into Summer got me hooked on both science fiction and Heinlein's work. In one month I read Starship Troopers, Have Space Suit, Will Travel, and Farmer in the Sky. Big problem tho, after reading so much Heinlein in such a short period of time, I started questioning everything and eventually got kicked out of Catholic school. Wink