Book Recommendation

Surtur 09-12-2003 02:58 PM
Right now I'm on book 3 of the Dune series by Frank Herbert. It's a tad coinfusing at first but it's one of the best sci fi series on earth. Also anything by J.R.R. Tolkien, especially The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion. Last, my favorite book is Eaters of the Dead by Michael Crichton (sp?). It's actually a compilation of various translations of an actual report made by an Arab diplomat to Northern Europe.
StevieV019 09-12-2003 03:20 PM
A small list...

"The Invisible Man" by Ralph Ellison
"Native Son" by Richard Wright
"Red Storm Rising" by Tom Clancy
"Lord of the Flies" By William Goulding (a classic...)

and of course more...Ill just have to think of them...
pen1300 09-12-2003 03:21 PM
Ok, I LOVE books, so I work with books. Big Grin (Used to the recommendation thing a little...)

Anyway: I did NOT like Machiavelli's The Prince- good philosophy book about how to rule Italy, be a man higher than God, etc. I found it quite dull, actually. It was a lot to chew.

Stuff I like: I've read TOO many books to remember all of them. I just remember bits.
The Shadow of Albion and Leopard in Exile (Carolus Rex series) by Andre Norton and Rosemary Edgehill: VERY good scifi/fantasy book. The story is basically, James Bond and his wife. His wife (actually married in the second book) is from the history WE know of, but she is switched into a parrallel universe. This is book one. The major plot of book two is to find a very Pagan Holy Grail/Cauldron. I LOVED these books!

Nero Wolfe books by Rex Stout: If you've seen the show on A&E, the books are EXACTLY like the show. I enjoyed these a lot.

Artemis Fowl/ Artemis Fowl: The Artic Incident/ Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code by Eion Colfer: A smart 12-14 year old boy has adventures with the an officer of the LEPrecon force. Very good books. Lots of laughs, and Butler (Artemis's body guard) is sooo cool. Artemis is very smart. Good times...though I didn't like the third as much as the first two.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen: Good classic book. I loved it. I read it after the six hour movie(with Colin Firth as Darcy). I don't understand why some people don't like this book...

Ruse: Enter the Detective and the second volume: Graphic novels that are TOO cool.

Well, my recommendations.

And I agree: People should LOVE to read!! They need to open a book, be it a children's book or War and Peace, people should read!

Another book worm Smile ),
Pen1300

EDIT: I'LL BE BACK TO THIS THREAD!!! I love recommendations. Big Grin
Lady Tesser 09-12-2003 03:57 PM
The Prince is dry - just an instruction manual in how to keep a princedom (when they ask you that in class, the main theme is getting and keeping power).

I also recommend for those who prefer comic books to read anything written by Alan Moore - League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (HELL of a lot better than the movie), Tom Strong, Top Ten, Swampthing (espcially the episodes he wrote). The man writes like the masters! Disturbing but wonderfully done (I won't even touch From Hell, I know I'll get nightmares).

Oh, and The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy - it's a really fun read. Think of it as the fun side of Les Miserables only a few decades earlier.
Mugiwara Luffy 09-12-2003 11:15 PM
Ok, I lied in my last post. Frankenstein was not the only book I liked last year. Another book that I just loved was Childhood's End by Aurthur C. Clarke. A very good sci-fi book. Definitely worth a read! Big Grin
Rouge 09-13-2003 12:38 AM
Yes Frankensetin was good.

As for me I like dark literature myself, and I suggest Anne Rice to those who like morbidly and really open minded.

Interview with the Vampire

The Vampire Lestat

Queen Of The Damned (Not like the movie that was horrible but an eben better masterpiece)

Of course Anne's recent books are "meh.." and got really boring, anoying or really nasty, those first three are a "must read" tough.
Sephiroth 02-16-2005 08:19 PM
The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner. One of the best books ever written. Its unbelievable. I don't think its part of any curriculum so, I doubt a great deal of people have read it. To those who have I salute you. To those who haven't, you should pick it up immediatly.
Generalissimo D 03-23-2005 09:37 PM
I cant believe I havent said this..

Shadow Man

This is a brilliant book. I admit, I was really shallow when I grabbed this book(It has one beauty of a cover.) When I started reading it I found it was a really deep story. It shoots back and forth between relatives and friends of a boy who died in a alchohol influenced carcrash. its like a dozen 1st person point of views. Really compelling. I highly recommend it if your in the mood to break the cycle of fantasy, sci-fi, and all that other junk you force your eyes to look at.
StevieV019 03-24-2005 07:57 AM
quote:
Interview with the Vampire

The Vampire Lestat

Queen Of The Damned


Yes, indeed, these are WONDERFUL books in the Vampire Chronicles. My favorites from Anne Rice.

If you all liked Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, check out Dean Koontz's new book based upon Mary Shelley's. Its called Prodigal Son, but it takes place 200 years after Frankenstein in modern day New Orleans. It was just printed about a month ago or so. I finished reading it over the weekend. Definitely check it out if you're into Dean Koontz and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

Also, as mentioned before...The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury gets my endorsement as well. Check it out.

One more: Battle Royale

An interesting Lord of the Flies/Most Dangerous Game-esque book taking place in Japan. You shouldnt be disappointed.
TanookiJoe 03-24-2005 01:17 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Lt. Smith
Another book that I just loved was Childhood's End by Aurthur C. Clarke. A very good sci-fi book. Definitely worth a read! Big Grin


I agree completely with that statement.

George Orwell's 1984 is sublime. Read it.

Cervantes's Don Quixote. To parrot a line said by so many others, the first real novel and one of the best. Funny, complex, engrossing. (Ironically, I've never finished it. Make of that what you will. Tongue )

Herman Wouk's The Cain Mutiny. One of the best war novels ever written.

No one said this list was restricted to fiction, so I'll say James McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom. The best history I've ever read, period.
Gummibear 03-30-2005 04:55 PM
I really would like to recommend - The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan. I had the oppurtunity to read it recently. I found it to be an excellent and very touching book. Amy Tan has a great writers voice. The whole book is very conversational, it's emotional and very witty.
088nd 03-30-2005 06:45 PM
Amerika by Franz Kafka. The style is pre-Kafkaesque, so it's a little bit optimistic and not too weird. It's about the life of an immigrant that arrives in America because of sexual misadventures, and goes on a journey to find the land of oppurtunity America is described as. It's not completely accurate, because Kafka never visited America.

Also Faust by Johann von Goethe is a classic I believe everyone should read.
6 moon dance 03-30-2005 09:38 PM
The Gate to Women's Country by Sherri Tepper. I like the way Tepper juxtaposes her description of a post nuclear holocaust society with Euripides' Trojan Women. Facinating insights about the military mind-set and relationships between men and women.

The Martha Quest series by Doris Lessing. She is an amazing writer and decades ahead of her time. There are five books in the series beginning with Martha Quest and ending with The Four-Gated City. Although Lessing claims that her work is not autobiographical, the stories seem to parallel her life as a white radical growing up in South Africa from the 1930's through the 50's.
Captain Maw 03-31-2005 02:30 PM
Well, i would suggest reading:

The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri (ugh, spelling)
i preferably enjoy The Inferno. mwuhahahaha! be sure to take the Dante's Inferno quiz afterwords...
http://www.4degreez.com/misc/dante-inferno-test.mv

Also:

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
some really twisted, wacked out $h*t with some really good writing elements in it. you feel really bad for the guy (Greg or something)
Buck Buck #1 03-31-2005 05:06 PM
A people's history of the United States is another good history book. It's put together from accounts of ordinary people so it's a drastically different history than what you may know. My US History teacher uses it quite a bit in his lessons.
TanookiJoe 03-31-2005 05:33 PM
quote:
Originally posted by com_bun_bun
A people's history of the United States is another good history book. It's put together from accounts of ordinary people so it's a drastically different history than what you may know. My US History teacher uses it quite a bit in his lessons.


I don't know about that. I think I read that and didn't much care for it.

Of course, I'm a history major and like my history considerably more hardcore than the average person, so whatever. Tongue
BethMcBeth 03-31-2005 05:40 PM
Defently Abarat by Clive Barker, its a amazing journey and I loved the illustartions too! ^_^"
A Clockwork Tomato 04-03-2005 02:06 PM
Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond is a really fascinating book that looks at how people react with their environment and each other, and how this adds up to social change.

Terry Pratchett's Discworld series is excellent. It's set in a world only marginally more real than Paradigm City (the Discworld is a flat world on top of four giant elephants standing on the shell of an immense turtle swimming through space), and it's very funny, but also thought-provoking. Start with the first book, The Colour of Magic, and just keep on going.
Darth Nat 04-06-2005 03:43 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Surtur
Right now I'm on book 3 of the Dune series by Frank Herbert.


I made it through Children of Dune, but the next book in the series, God Emperor of Dune, really lost me. I never could finish the book. It just borders on being strange and absurd.

Right now I'm finishing up the final book in the Dune prequel trilogy: Dune: House Corrino. This trilogy has really surprised me, and I've thoroughly enjoyed it. They are much easier books to read than the original Dune series despite their length. They tell the story from multiple angles as well, so you're not just stuck reading about the adventures of Leto Atreides or one of the heroes. It really puts a lot of things from the original book into perspective.

And I'm convinced now that Hasimir Fenring is the coolest character in the entire Dune universe. He's such a major badass in these books.
TanookiJoe 04-06-2005 06:46 PM
quote:
Originally posted by A Clockwork Tomato
Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond is a really fascinating book that looks at how people react with their environment and each other, and how this adds up to social change.


I've noticed that at the bookstore and considered buying it. I probably should, the formula History Book + Pulitzer Prize has never let me down.